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Hello Friends,

“I think we can safely say Dixon is cured,” Dr. John Tisdale recently told Dixon’s father, Leonard. What amazing words for a parent to hear from his son’s doctor!

17-year-old Dixon is one the young brave patients, treated in an experimental study at the National Institutes of Health, that Friends of Patients at the NIH has helped support.

Dixon came to the NIH last year seeking treatment for Sickle Cell Disease. His father took him and his older sister, Flavia, to India initially from their native country, Uganda. They both had Sickle Cell Disease and suffered severe pain crises. The family could only afford treatment for one child at a time, so Flavia told her little brother, “You go first.” Unfortunately, Flavia died waiting for care.

The best hope for a cure from this painful blood cell disease is a stem cell transplant – and when Dixon’s father heard about this treatment in the United States, he resolved to do everything possible to save Dixon’s life.

Hear Dixon’s story in his own words, meet his father and his physician/researcher who has pioneered this groundbreaking cure.
Dixon’s Story: Click here to view video

Friends at NIH helped Dixon’s father return home last year when his job was in jeopardy and his mother flew in to take his place. This year, we paid airfare for the father/son team to return for a critical follow up visit. Dr. Tisdale confirms that Dixon could not have remained in the treatment if Friends at NIH had not helped.

Now Dixon is a healthy, strong, young man. Please help us grow and be stronger. During this holiday season, consider making a gift to help more patients, like Dixon, and their families. Be a part of creating the cures of tomorrow!

Sincerely,

Heidi

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